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By in Brewing 0

Guest Brewery #5 Cloudwater

CloudwaterHow much is too much for a pint? It wasn’t that long ago when us northerners would avoid London beer prices. £3? Na, I’m happy up hear, thanks. What about £13? Last year Cloudwater, possibly the most hyped craft beer brewery around hit the headlines with their £13 pint in London. Sadly it’s not only London where you’re paying more than a tenner. Is this Cloudwater’s fault? Is there more to the story than the headline and, most importantly, would you pay it?

No. Yes. The third question needs to be rephrased. Are the short answers. Let’s dig a little deeper…

You are reading this because you have an interest in good beer. You don’t need to be sold to but there’s more reasons behind the price than just hype or a label but the hype doesn’t help, especially for the likes of Cloudwater. The Manchester brewery have only been going for a few years, they are relatively small but they’ve had to grow up fast and that, in itself doesn’t come cheap. They are also small in terms of the amount of beer they can brew and when you’re making headlines, whether for good or bad, you are going to be in demand. They have had to hike prices up to keep to high standards and to slow down the demand.

Breweries don’t get into it to make lots of money, they want to make beer they love and that’s why people like what we do, we want to be proud about the product. A hand brewed beer, made with love, care and the best ingredients is incomparable to a pint of lager made on mass, by machines with low quality ingredients. You can find yourself paying a fiver for that anyway. With some craft beers, like the famed 9% double IPA we’ve got to change our mindset and think of it like you would a good bottle of decent wine, then the price doesn’t seem that bad. You wouldn’t buy a pint of wine and you probably shouldn’t buy a pint of this either, you’d be steaming. You get what you pay for.

Who are Cloudwater and why should you give a shit? The name might be kind of new (established 2015) but the brewers certainly aren’t. They’ve been making (and drinking) beers for years now so it’s not just some amateurs, jumping in on the bandwagon Nathan Barely style. They pride themselves on using seasonal ingredients which not only ensures that they have the ability to make beers in their prime but they can continually change their range. They are always tweaking their recipes as they look for improvements. Cloudwater’s signature Double IPA has evolved over the last two years as the brewers have gained new inspirations, it’s currently at v3.1. They are the Heston Blumenthal of beer; adventurous, innovative, sometimes daring but it’s the end result that really matters.

Based in the centre of Manchester, underneath Piccadilly train station arches (their tap room is worth a visit), Alphabet Brewery and Chorlton Brewery are their neighbours. Sheffield might be the beer capital but Manchester is becoming a strong competitor!

What’s your budget for a good pint? Or half? Or a third? What about a glass of wine with your meal? Probably about the same. And, five quid for a pint of shitty lager or a third of something decent? Think of it like a treat, rather than a session drink, there’s plenty of other great beers to choose from after your tastebuds have been tantalised by Cloudwater anyway.

They aren’t in the worlds top 15 breweries in the world for the sake of it.

For more information on Cloudwater, visit their website. Want to taste what all the fuss is about? Pop into the Ale Club, if it’s not on tap, you’ll find some cans in the fridge to drink in or take home.

By in Uncategorised 0

Will Arctic Monkeys bring the Kings of Music crown back to the Steel City?

Arctic Monkeys 2018The Steel City gets overlooked as a city of importance compared to many in the UK. London, Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds, Dublin and Glasgow are celebrated more than Sheffield and it seems a bit unfair. We’ve always produced quality, our steel was the best in the world, our beer is and our music scene has had defining moments for generations.

Over the decades our musicians have impacted the sound of pop culture from Def Leppard’s stadium rock anthems in the 1970’s to the electro shift in the 80’s thanks to the Human League. Pulp’s arty take on guitar music coined a different direction for Brit Pop in the 90’s. These bands weren’t the only ones in the city, they were just the ones who broke through to the mainstream but underneath the genre leaders was a vibrant scene that made life up north not so grim.

Music scenes come-and-go. After the heady days of Brit Pop, there was a lull in guitar music as dance music and raves became the phenomena and again, Sheffield offered a helping hand with influential club nights at Gatecrasher. Whilst this was offering an outlet for many, there was a new group of boys in bands, inspired by The Strokes, The White Stripes, Kings of Leon and The Libertines.

Sheffield Steel City isn’t a pretentious city, it’s not overly cool or try hard and the bands who were bringing indie back looked more like they’d come straight from a pluming job or they were off to a football match, but they weren’t ‘lads’. A new scene was forming, The Leadmill, The Boardwalk, The Fuzz Club, The Harley, The Fez Club all played an important role in this new sound that was spearheaded by Milburn who were more influenced by Oasis than The Strokes.

Arctic Monkeys 2003After a couple of years of gigging throughout Sheffield Milburn weren’t the only one picking up guitars in Sheffield. There was 1984, The Dodgems, Little Man Tate, The Long Blondes and of course, High Green’s finest, Arctic Monkeys. This quartet, friends with Milburn nailed their sound relatively quickly. Their first gig took place at The Grapes in the Steel City in June 2003 where they covered Hotel Yorba by The White Stripes.

Over the following 18 months they built up a fan base through gigging, supporting the likes of The Ordinary Boys and Tom Vek but their fans didn’t exclusively come from the Steel City. This was a unique time in music where the internet was building music scenes on web forums. Arctic Monkeys often get labelled the first band of the internet but it was actually The Libertines who took advantage of breaking the fourth wall and using forums to interact with fans. It wasn’t just a platform to do this though, it gave likeminded people to talk to each other, make friends and share music. Arctic Monkeys gave out demos at their gigs and fans uploaded and shared these songs on forums such as the libertines.org and MySpace. It was a natural and authentic move that took the media and the band by surprise.

Arctic Monkeys debut albumAt the time the NME was the indie kid bible and they started taking notice in early 2005. The band were selling out The Boardwalk (whilst working on the bar), with a crowd singing their songs, word-for-word without any official release. By the end of the year the Arctic Monkeys had become the hottest band in the country, they had number one singles, sell out tours and so much hype that helped elevate the whole Sheffield music scene. Bands like Milburn, who had been around much longer than the Monkeys were benefitting.

Arctic Monkeys AMWhatever People Say I Am was released in January 2006 and it remains the fastest selling debut album of all time in the UK. 12 years on and the band haven’t looked back, their sound has evolved as they have grown from teenagers to global rock stars. This Friday (11th May), the band release their sixth album Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino. This is the long-await follow-up to the flawless AM (released in 2013) and expectations are high. People always say that following up a successful debut is the hardest but there wasn’t any signs of that when they released Favourite Worst Nightmare.

Arctic Monkeys Tranquility Base HotelThe bands forthcoming arena tour (including 4 nights at the Sheffield Arena) sold out immediately. There’s going to be ‘pop-up shops’ this weekend across the world (including Barkers Pool in the city centre) and a petition for Alex to shave of his beard (it does look a bit daft). After 5 consistently good albums and 5 years since the highly regarded AM, is this going to be the difficult sixth album or will they put the Steel City back on the map?

By in Events 0

Smo Fo Pit Stop May Bank Holiday

Smo Fo Pit Stop May Bank HolidayDon’t you just love this time of year, we’re seeing glimpses of summer and the weeks get shorter as we are bombarded with Bank Holidays. Great, isn’t? When the two combine you really need to embrace it as it’s pretty rare. The Easter weekend was a bit of a write off which was unfortunate for Smo Fo Smoked Food who launched their first BBQ event Smo Fo Pit Stop in the Summit House car park in town. It wasn’t BBQ weather, it was bloody freezing!

If Carol from BBC Breakfast is telling the truth then they have nothing to worry about as the sun will be shining for the second Smo Fo Pit Stop on May Day Bank Holiday. That’s right, a full weekend packed with sunshine! Smo Fo Smoked Food have been supplying the city with smoked bar snacks, designed to partner craft beers for over 3 years now, the Pit Stop takes them into new areas. The business started out as a butcher, supplying Sheffield’s pubs with pies and scotch eggs and the growth has been a natural course of events. If you haven’t tried their smoked pork scratchings you don’t know what you are missing out on!

Smo Fo Pit Stop Meat MenuYou might not think a BBQ in a car park in the middle of the Sheffield is the perfect combo. Usually you can enjoy the risk of cooking burgers and sausages in your garden. Smo Fo takes things up a level with a taste of the Deep South without having to fly 10 hours to enjoy what Texas has to offer (it’s worth a visit though!) just across the road from the Plug from Friday through to Sunday.

It’s not glamorous but it doesn’t need to be. They haven’t settled for some pulled pork and beef brisket, their menu is extensive, covering the best off Texas and beyond with Asian Baus and steak burgers, obviously their pub snacks are available too.

Sm Fo Pit Stop Closed Shop MenuIf you aren’t a meat eater don’t worry, The Closed Shop have put together an equally delicious sounding menu. The Vegan friendly BBQ includes burgers, koftas and soya Mac and cheese.

And the best part?

What goes perfectly with meat? BEER! They’ve gone and pulled the double with picking some of Sheffield’s best breweries to quench the thirst including Sentinel Brewery, Abbeydale Brewery and us!

There’s live music and DJs across the weekend too.

If you want to enjoy the sun, eat good grub, some great beer and music over the Bank Holiday weekend then Smo Fo Pit Stop ticks the boxes! Children and dogs are welcome for this free event.

More info on the Facebook event page.

P.S. Save money on an Uber and burn off those calories with a Olo yellow bike

By in Uncategorised 0

Guest Brewery #4 Magic Rock

Magic Rock BreweryHave you looked in the fridge at your favourite beer stop and been blinded by brightly coloured cans? It’s probably one by Huddersfield breweries Magic Rock who became national favourites almost immediately.

Magic Rock CansThey started as a trio back in 2011 and the team has grown to 30, helping to supply the increasing demands and run their tap room, open 6 days a week.

Inspired by the American craft beer scene the 3 beer fans wanted to create something similar, to sell locally, which, back in early 2011 wasn’t easy to find. These days their beers are bold, unique but delicious. They like to be creative with ingredients but priorities taste over experiment and they’re available in cask, keg, bottle and can. Magic Rock haven’t reinvented the wheel, they have just improved the performance with their proactive attitude.

High Wire Magic RockHigh Wire is their ‘go-to’ beer, popular on tap or in cans, you’ll have seen it in the Ale Club. This West Coast Pale tastes of what Magic Rock were first inspired by, American pales. It’s full flavoured, hoppy and 5.5%, memorable, unless you have a few too many. The term ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ isn’t one that Magic Rock live by as they have reinvented their classic with a second version of the best seller, High Wire Grapefruit, perfect for those who love a punch of tart pink grapefruit infused in their beer.Magic Rock Grapefruit High Wire

Inhaler is a new favourite to the Magic Rock pale family, this session comes in at 4.5% and it’s tropical fruits make it easily drinkable for a sesh.

Magic Rock sours Salty KissSours aren’t for everybody but Salty Kiss is a great introduction for newbies, sharp on the first taste but the gooseberries settle down into something refreshing.

Their adventurous side comes out with the triple coffee porter, Common Grounds whilst they cater for the lager louts with Dancing Bear which will embarrass the corporate brewers.

Their tap room is based on the outskirts of Huddersfield city centre and opens Tuesdays to Sundays. At weekends they host events, food and brewery tours. For more information about Magic Rock visit their website.

By in Uncategorised 0

Sheffield: The Outdoor City

The Outdoor CityThe sun is out, finally! It’s felt like an eternity. We’ve battled through dark days, darker nights and snow but, fingers crossed we might be able to pack the coats, scarfs and gloves away, well, for a couple of months anyway. It’s time to grab your sunnies, shorts and enjoy Sheffield, the outdoor city.

Everything looks better in the sun, especially Sheffield, our city. It can be a bleak place in the winter. The weather is probably one of the reasons why we love beer so much. We need it to get through the cold months, then when the sun does make an appearance it becomes ‘beer garden weather’. There’s always an excuse for a pint in the outdoor city.

The city really comes to life in the summertime and it deserves to be explored. Whether you like culture or adventures, you won’t be bored in the outdoor city. The alternative guide to enjoying Sheffield in the sun.

1. Festivals

Music, food, drink, art we’ve got it all going on here. From community street parties such as Sharrow Vale Market to Sheffield Food Festival in the centre, free events that celebrate the city.

Tramlines SheffieldThen of course there’s Tramlines, the music festival, now in its 10th year, it has grown out of it’s inner-city home to Hillsborough Park headlined by Stereophonics, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds and Craig David’s TS5. If you don’t fancy venturing to Hillsborough there will be plenty of fringe events going on in the city centre too.

2. Parks

It’s not just Hillsborough that has a park worth a visit, we’ve got over 200 parks and public gardens, one of the main reasons Sheffield is the outdoor city. Endcliffe Park and the Botanical Gardens are a brief walk from the Ale Club whilst the Peace Gardens is a place to chill in the city centre. Graves Park offers an opportunity to see some animals or play pitch and putt. We’re the 6th greenest city in the UK! If you fancy a short road trip visit the Peak District.

3. Beer Gardens

Brothers Arms beer garden‘It’s beer garden weather’ is probably the most used phrase when we get a glimpse of sun. We’re well prepared for this with some incredible beer gardens all around from The Brothers Arms in Heeley which boasts amazing views of the city to the roof top bar at Krynkl in Kelham Island. The Lescar in Sharrow Vale is peaceful in the afternoon and The Rutland Arms in the centre is always great.

 

4. Activities

Thought skiing was only for snowing mountains? Nope. Sheffield makes use of one the many hills with its ski village. It’s safe to say that it’s had a turbulent past. It’s kind of ironic that it closed down after being destroyed by a fire, but it’s rising like a phoenix in the flames. After being shut for a few years they have finally had investment to reopen in 2019.

5. Ride

Yellow OFO bikesWe’re not only the ‘outdoor city’, we’ve become cycle city since the Ofo yellow bikes landed. Who’d have thought they would have been so successful, especially for a city with so many hills but they are taking over and cycling is the best way to explore.

Summer doesn’t last long, enjoy it with a cold pint in the outdoor city.

For more information on The Outdoor City visit their website.

By in Awards 0

Exposed Awards 2018

Exposed Awards 2018We are delighted to be nominated for Best New Bar at the Exposed Awards this year! It’s been a crazy few months for us, there was a lot of hard work prior to opening but it’s been well worth it. To be amongst the likes of Public and The Old Workshop in the Exposed Awards Best New Bar category is one hell of compliment.

We’d be honoured to take home the award but we aren’t a competitive bunch (we’re Sheffielders, we like to support our fellow nominees). Here’s a few of our favourite Exposed Awards nominees making our city great.

Best Live Venue – Picture House Social

Pizza, ping pong, bands and drinks, Picture House Social is your one-stop venue for the perfect night out. Picture House Social hosts a variety of events. When it comes to live music they have their finger on the pulse for booking bands who are on the way to greater things including Goat Girl, Cabbage and The Big Moon.

Made in Sheffield – Henderson’s Relish

HendosHendos sums up Sheffield perfectly. It’s something we’re proud of, we’re passionate about this condiment and we’ll defend it like our life depends on it. It’s been debated in the House of Commons and Everly Pregnant Brothers’ song, Hendos is an anthem. We treasure the relish and we don’t want it leaving the city.

A meal isn’t complete without it swimming in Hendos.

Best Local Event – Peddler Market

Peddler MarketFood and beer in a warehouse, it couldn’t represent the Steel City any better. The monthly night market is unique and the novelty factor hasn’t worn off, it’s popularity continues to grow. Both traders and punters travel across the country for this free event, queues around the block are formed, even in the snow!

Once you’ve made it in you’ll find a variety of cuisines, decent beers from craft breweries, music and art, all in the heart of Kelham Island.

Best Independent Retailer – Beer Central

Beer Central, housed in the Moor Market is more than just an off license. The bottle shop is a haven for beer lovers as they stock bottles and cans from Sheffield’s finest breweries as well as those from around the UK and worldwide.

The decision to purchase is near impossible with such a great selection but help is on hand from the highly knowledgable staff. Beats a trip to the supermarket, right?

Best New Bar – Public

PublicWho’d think a former public toilet would make a cool cocktail bar? The same minds behind Tramlines, Picture House Social and Daisy’s Bar, that’s who! Public is small, really small but it’s worth queuing for. Their drinks menu is inspiring (it’s a book!) and the actual drinks are not your standard cocktail.

Going to Public is the best toilet experience you’ll ever have, the vibe is chilled and you can sit comfortably knowing there’s a line of people outside wanting your seat!

The Exposed Awards take place at 92 Burton Road on 17th May, more details available here.

By in Uncategorised 0

Equity for Punks

BrewdogNot another BrewDog blog? Yes, but there’s a reason, two or 75,000 Equity for Punks. For the experienced craft beer taster you might not have touched BrewDog in years, since you found something more niche. It’s probably too mainstream or cliche. Unfortunately their success has led to a backlash but that’s the British for you, always ready to pounce on anybody doing well. I’m pretty sure the Scottish brewers don’t mind upsetting a few people, that has been part of their success and their Equity for Punks campaign shows that they still have a loyal army behind them.

Equity for PunksThis week the Equity for Punks AGM takes place in Aberdeen. This isn’t a boring meeting about ticking boxes in a stuffy office with middle aged men wearing ill-fitting suits. BrewDog have been successful because of investments, not from wealthy businessmen from Dubai who have never tasted an IPA but from their drinkers, over 75,000 of them have invested £55 million in total, breaking the fourth wall between business and consumer. Their crowdfunding campaigns are unique and give customers a voice, their reward, is one hell of a party in the city that is becoming better known for brewing than oil these days.

I am PunkIn the past decade BrewDog has challenged the craft beer industry (notably CAMRA), mainstream alcohol manufactures and tastebuds. Punk, the American influenced IPA is their flagship beer, it was their breakthrough and continues it’s legacy, it’s inspired new brewers, converted lager drinkers to craft beer and it’s found in supermarkets but there’s so much more to BrewDog than Punk.

Putin BrewDogTheir controversial marketing campaigns have helped build exposure, ‘all press is good press’ has certainly been a mindset that BrewDog has taken. The tongue-in-cheek Pink campaign, mocking other brands who use patronising female cliches was misunderstood by many, as was the anti-Putin/pro-gay beer. They celebrated one crowdfunding success by dropping ‘fat cat’ taxidermy from a helicopter over London.

BrewDog End of HistoryThe investments have allowed them to increase their Aberdeen brewery and expand globally. With more brewing opportunities they are able to be more creative, not just in marketing but in their beers too. Their core range is constantly growing and becoming more and more available but it’s their specials which make BrewDog beers interesting, maybe ‘The End of History’, the worlds strongest beer 55% was more of a publicity stunt than something to drink but it was there to prove a point.

BrewDog LoneWolf GinThe presence of BrewDog is increasing too. It wasn’t long ago when pubs were closing down at a rapid rate in the UK, however BrewDog bars have been doing the opposite and opening on high-streets around the world. It’s the fastest growing food and drinks company in the UK, they have also moved into the gin (LoneWolf) and vodka market and as a company they are worth over £1bn, not bad for a couple of home brewers wanting to make a decent pint.

The BrewDog story began like most craft brewers, home brewing, D.I.Y. style, that hobby in 2005 shifted into something ground breaking, a 21st century business model that shows that the world doesn’t need to give in to corporates, like punk did. The business moved from a garage to a warehouse in 2007 and the first beer to be brewed was Punk.

Equity for Punks 2018The Equity for Punks AGM is a ticketed event for the shareholders and they get snapped up immediately. Why? Well, beer, music and food, the perfect collaboration. 7000 Equity for Punks will get a business talk from the owners (it is business after all and there’s always a lot going on at BrewDog), once the numbers have been crunched there’s a great line-up of music including Paws, The Big Moon and Maximo Park. Obviously there’s plenty of beer available too.

Why can’t all businesses run like this?

By in Uncategorised 0

Craft Beer in the UK is reaching out to a new audience

Is there a bitter taste is the mouth for craft beer in the UK or is it just evolving?

The craft beer in the UK market is seeing a new shift, a shift even further away from your grandads bitter than ever before. This is due to accessibility and the adaptation of mainstream, taking it from sub-culture to urban culture. The perception of beer is changing, IPAs are gradually winning over lager drinkers, there has never been so much choice. It wasn’t long ago that you’d struggle to find an IPA, it’s hard to avoid Brewdog these days.

Brewdog pinkThe Scottish brewers recently hit the headlines with two campaigns, the ‘Pink’ launch (reaching out to women) and their 1 million giveaway, a ploy to target the Carling crowd. They hope that a free pint of Punk will turn them into paying customers. It isn’t just on paper where Brewdog have been dominating, you’ll find them in the unlikeliest of places, the bars and clubs that wouldn’t have entertained anything other than your standard lager just a few months are now stocking Punk. Music festivals were once a lager filled weekend, Carling used to sponsor Reading and Leeds, these days they are offering craft alternatives. This could be because they can charge more money or that tastes are changing?

Many will argue about Brewdog’s presence in craft beer. They are bit like Man City, they do the job flawlessly but they’ve done it with investment, lots of it. They still claim that they continue with the craft mentality, they continue to take chances, grow. They have been able to break into the mainstream which can only be a great thing for the whole industry. The more people who taste Punk are the next ones who will buy Jaipur, Gamma Ray or High Wire, once hooked there’s no turning back.

There’s a new hierarchy forming, it was noticeable at Sheffield Beer Week. Is it just about investment and marketing or is it quality and innovation? We’ve got the elite brewers (Brewdog, Beavertown, Goose Island), the local heroes (every city has them), the old schoolers, the breakthrough home brewers and the underdogs who are a bit left wing.

Bitter about bitter, or lack of? Real ale was, up until recently what your granddad drank, that murky, still, warm liquid in a pint class. It wasn’t sexy like your pint of Bud. Bitter is the reason beer gets a bad reputation. The pale ales have been changing that perception, the fruity aromas are much more palatable on the tastebuds making it much easier to convert lager drinkers, it makes brewing a better business model.

The UK craft beer scene might be growing but with all the focus on developing and twisting the IPA, the bitter has been forgotten about by many new breweries. The old men who spend their afternoons in the pub are finding it hard to jump on the craft beer bandwagon. They don’t care about the artwork, if it’s suitable for Vegans or made with ingredients sourced locally, they just want the bitter taste that they have always loved and change from £3. They don’t care for Man City’s slick techniques, forward thinking attitudes and big money innovations, they are happy with Burnley’s solid reputation, it might not be exciting but it works.

Is brewing becoming more about spreadsheets and sales figures or is there true love in that 330ml can that costs £8? They’ll always be businesses in any industry but it’s those who work with passion who will succeed in the long-term. What makes craft beer in the UK great in 2018 is that there’s a taste and budget for everybody.

By in Uncategorised 0

What’s on for Easter in Sheffield

Easter Bank Holiday Weekend is the perfect opportunity to party! There’s not the pressure like Christmas and it’s a long one! So, what is happening at Easter in Sheffield?

Easter in Sheffield Craft BeedIt’s a four-dayer and it all kicks off on Good Friday at Yellow Arch in Kelham Island for their beer festival. The iconic venue are hosting their 3rd beer festival with some of Sheffield’s finest breweries include The Brew Foundation! We’ll be there, with great company from Stancill Brewery and Lost Industry Brewing. All good festivals need food and Proove Pizza are doing just that. It’s great value for money as entrance is just £1.50 (pint class included!) and there’s DJs playing funk until ‘late’. More details available here.

Easter in Sheffield BBQHopefully the weather picks up (not looking likely) as Smo Fo Pit Stop is taking place throughout the weekend at Summit House car park on Eyre Street with BBQ food, craft beer and bands. This pop—up event is the first of what will become a monthly event. They’ve sourced some of the best BBQ going, catering for carnivores and vegans so that nobody goes hungry. Beer is supplied by Sheffield favourites, Abbeydale Brewery, Sentinel and Kelham Island Brewery. Fingers crossed that the weather men are wrong, BBQ is the snow isn’t ideal. More info here.

Remember, Jesus died for this!

Canalside Night MarketSaturday sees the 3rd Canalside Night Market at the Southbank Warehouse. Kicking off at 2 there’s a wide range of food and drink available including a bar dedicated to gin. There’ll also be live music, DJ’s and artists keeping entertainment going until 11pm.

More details here.

Easter in Sheffield Leadmill specialOnce you’ve eaten your way through your chocolate eggs to get over the hangover, Easter Sunday is all about letting loose and Common People at the Leadmilli ideal for Brit pop and noughties indie fans as hits will be played from 11pm to 4am.

There’s plenty to do for Easter in Sheffield, make the most from the long weekend. Don’t forget to pop in to the Ale Club, we are open all weekend!

By in Events 0

The Garden Brewery Takeover

garden brewery logoSheffield Beer Week is great, right? We’re loving the enthusiasm and passion Sheffield has for beer. There’s been some great events held throughout the city and there’s plenty more to come but tonight it’s our turn as we get to showcase the brilliant beers by The Garden Brewery at the Ale Club.

Garden Brewery tapWe’ve been pouring The Garden Brewery’s finest beers since opening the tap room, the Samphire Sour and the Milkshake IPA have been going down a treat so, to coincide with Sheffield Beer Week we’ve let the Croatian brewery takeover the bar for the night.

So, who are The Garden Brewery?

The Garden Brewery story is a little different to most, it began with a music festival in Croatia by a promoter from Birmingham. The Garden has been one of Europes leading dancing music festivals since launching in 2006 but after 10 years they decided to focus on beer instead. The timing couldn’t have been better as Croatia was gaining a craft brewery scene whilst the connections from the festival circuit gave them an outlet early on and they’ve gone from strength-to-strength.

Garden Brewery beerTheir state of the art brewery allows them to brew different beers quickly, they have the ability to brew their core range on mass and test or create specials in smaller batches too, giving them the opportunity to grow fast without losing the excitement that comes with experimenting with different ingredients, flavours and tastes.

Unlike many breweries who specialise in one style The Garden Brewery’s core range is as eclectic as they come, stouts to sours whilst their pales IPA’s aren’t your typical style as they include citrus IPAs and honey double IPAs.

They pride themselves in the ingredients that they use to brew. These are natural and unfiltered, giving a more intense flavour, the hops come from around the world whilst the malts are imported from the UK which might give some familiarity to the taste produced.

Based in Zagreb, The Garden Brewery tap room is open 7 days a week, serving their core range and specialise on cask, keg, bottle and can which will taste much fresher than you’d experience after being imported over land and sea. They offer guided tours and tasting sessions too! And, obviously, should you get peckish, there’s food available too from Submarine a shipping container in the brewery, serving burgers and ice cream, made with locally sourced ingredients.

More info The Garden Brewery, their beers and their tap room (well worth a visit if you’re in Croatia) is available here.

Don’t forget to check out our Sheffield Beer Week offers, available until Sunday.