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Craft Beer World Cup: The Favourites – Brazil

Brazil World CupAre you enjoying the football? You aren’t the only ones! News broke that there could be a beer shortage (a crisis in our minds!) as demand is so high. Harry Kane’s last minute winner might be held responsible for this. The World Cup isn’t just about the football, it brings the world together and what is the best way to share culture? Beer! With Brazil being tournament favourites we thought we’d check in to the Brazil craft beer scene.

Brazil might best be associated with diversity, colour, carnivals, cocktails and Latino culture but it’s climate and resources offer the opportunity to brew vibrant beers, best enjoyed cold on warm, humid days.

Brazil craft beer has had a growth spurt, these days it’s widely available throughout the country from supermarkets to ‘hipster bars’ (yep, there’s hipsters in Brazil too!) and restaurants, offering Brazilians many opportunities to grab a decent beer, brewed with skill.

Brazil Craft Beer OktoberfestThere’s several key breweries that are currently favoured in Brazil, inspired by Europe and America. The European influence can be traced back to the 1800s when German immigrants brought their beer craving with them. This continues today, Brazil’s Oktoberfest is one of the biggest in the world, lasting 18 days, attracting 730,000, proving Brazilians, love beer as much as their carnivals! There’s plenty of other beer festivals that happen in the country which are highly attended.

Although South American beers are yet to have a major impact on the craft beer market, that could be changing thanks to unique ingredients and palettes which have woken up interest from the likes of Brooklyn Brewery and Mikkeller.

Due to the hot weather, hops are hard to come-by and importing can be expensive making brewers think more creatively. Dia da Cerveja Imura is an event that produces some of the most diverse beers in the world as no yeast, hops or water are allowed! What makes the taste unique is that many breweries are ageing beers in barrels previously used for tropical spirits.

The wealth of natural ingredients can be found in many pints including Amazon Beer, who use passion fruits and coffee can be tasted in Cervejaria Colorado’s iconic Demoiselle.

2cabecas Brazil Craft Beer2cabecas are the brewery you’d hope for in Brazil, their passionfruit IPA and Funk IPA have that tropical taste, from one mouthful you are ready to party.

4 years might not seem long but in craft beer times it can be like a lifetime and Hocus Pocus have become well established in South America with Belgian golden ale, Magic Trap and their American pale ales.

Nina JeffreyJeffrey, from Rio de Janeiro are on of the most recognisable breweries in the country, two of their most popular beers are influenced by Europe, Nina, brewed like a Belgian white beer and their Pilsen has a familiarity to Germany. Three Monkeys, also from Rio offer something a little different with their popular Wit Vezpa, an Indian white beer.

Three Monkeys Brazil Craft BeerSao Paulo is Brazil’s most cosmopolitan city and the heart of craft beer scene. Cervejaria Nacionak are one of the front runners thanks to their citrus Mula IPA, guaranteed to bring the party to life, coming in at 7.5%. The high-rollers in Sao Paulo clearly love their stronger beers as Cervejaria Invicta’s popular imperial stout will leave you buzzing at 10.8%!

Growth in sales and the number of Brazilian craft breweries is growing 40% year-on-year. Who knew the Brazil craft beer scene was as vibrant as their party spirits? It’s probably the reason Neymar is always falling over! There’s plenty of football left, it’s best watched with a beer in the hand, our bottle shop at Ecclesall Ale Club is fully stocked with beers from around the world.

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Craft Beer World Cup: The Hosts – Russia

Russia World CupYou might have heard, there’s a football thing happening right now. Football is great but it’s much better with a nice pint in your hand. This years World Cup is being hosted in Russia, everybody’s favourite worst enemy. If they aren’t trying to poison people they are probably downing their finest vodka, but wait, there’s more to Russia than killing off spies or vodka, the Russia craft beer scene is booming right now.

If you are heading to the World Cup you don’t need to pack your suitcase with cans of your favourite beer on the 2,0000 mile trip, they have some great bars and breweries. Don’t fancy risking your life in planet Putin to taste what the Russian’s are brewing, they export too!

Unlike many, Russia’s craft beer scene revolves around the darker side of a pint, the stouts and the porters, which kind of suits the perception of the country. Tropical pales can get lost when drank in the countries cold weather and winter warming food.

The Russia craft beer inspirations can be traced back to London in the late 1600’s when Russian tsar, Peter the Great enjoyed stouts and porters drank by the dockworkers. Ever since, Russia brewers have continued to take influence from Britain but switching it up a level, as in, making the ABV higher, again this keeps in line with the stern Russian perception. The Russian Imperial Stout was born.

Soviet Russia (1922 – 1991) saw restraints on the availability of ingredients, making drink habits change. Vodka and mainstream lager became much more accessible but since the turn of this century the Russia craft beer was revived and their dark beers saw the light again!

Af Brew RussiaThe scene has grown fast, craft beer bars, shops and breweries have been popping up across the vast country. AF Brew from St Petersburg were the first to excite Russian’s with a pale ale whilst Rule Taproom and Craft RePUBlic in Moscow showcase the countries best breweries which are devise and unique. Jawsspot is one of the most successful breweries in Russia, their pale ale can be found all over.

Rule Taproom Russia Craft BeerSt Petersburg plays a key role in the Russia craft beer scene, it’s the home of Stepan Razin (no longer on operation) and Vena, Russia’s first breweries were founded here whilst tap rooms and microbreweries can be found throughout the city including Redrum and Bakunin Brewery.

Russia might not have the best reputation as a holiday destination but that can all change after the World Cup which seems to be going smoothly so far… It’s got an interesting history, great buildings and from the sounds, a vibrant and growing craft beer movement. It’s the third biggest producer of beer in the world.

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Barcelona Craft Beer is One to Watch

Barcelona is best known for tapas, wine, pick pocketers and art but the Barcelona craft beer scene is growing fast and it’s not hard to see why!

The city offers more than most as it’s not only a vibrant hub with an iconic past but also a creative future. What makes it unique is its surroundings, greenery and the sea. This, along with the climate gives the food and drink real authenticity as natural ingredients are readily available and seasonal. Those vineyards are gifted with its resources, the reason their wine tastes so good. They have started to use this to make exciting beers which are largely influenced by America but you can taste the Mediterranean twist.

Black Lab BarcelonaIn the last few years breweries have been appearing in Barcelona. Black Lab, the first tap room in the city is situated right by the sea, the perfect location for the freshest ingredients. It is a real gem for beer lovers, whether local or tourist. At Black Lab you’ll find a range of beers and beer infused cocktails, they brew and experiment onsite but they also collaborate with breweries from around the world. Barcelona is full of great food but if you’re enjoying the beer too much then eat in!

NaparBCN Barcelona Craft BeerBlack Lab is perfect for capturing tourists but if you’re looking for something a bit more ‘Barcelona’ then head to Eixample. You’ll be in beer heaven as local bars have embraced the craft beer trend whilst the area also has BrewDog and Mikkeller bars. NaparBCN is something special. It’s a classy place, not a dirty tap and their beers are just as good as the marbled interior. Initially, NaparBCN was going to be a restaurant, celebrating the city’s best ingredients, as the Barcelona craft beer scene developed the guys behind the food saw that they might as well make the beer if they are making the food.

Edge BrewingAway from the centre there’s Edge Brewing. Founded by two Americans, Edge have capitalised on the new craft trend, using their experience and local ingredients to produce wow-factor beer.

Other cool places offering the best in Barcelona craft beer include Olgod in Raval and the wonderfully named Bollocks Bar in the Gothic Quarter.

As cities go, Barcelona is relatively cheap, like most, craft beers can get pricey but you will be pleasantly surprised when the bill comes. You don’t really need an excuse to visit but if you do, make it a tasting trip. There’s more to Barcelona beer than Estrella.

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Sheffield Food Festival

Sheffield Food Festival logoSheffield Food Festival 2018.

Bank Holiday Weekends come in thick and fast in Spring and it seems like we’ve struck lucky two times running with the weather. Sheffielders love a festival, there’s always something going on, and Bank Holiday Weekends make another excuse to indulge. The Sheffield Food Festival is taking over the city centre for the eighth year running.

We are proud ‘makers’ here. We always have been and we are particularly good when it comes to food and drink (read about our breweries here and here). We have everything from independent restaurants from all cultures to highly skilled butchers and artisan bakers. The Sheffield Food Festival takes over the Peace Gardens and continues down Fargate with stalls offering the best of Sheffield, all in one place.

Ice Cream Sheffield Food FestivalFor the first time the festival kicked off on Friday, unfortunately that was the day the sun decided to have a break so it was a bit of a wash out but that wasn’t the case for Saturday which brought out thousands of people to the city centre. There was an upbeat atmosphere, queues on almost every stall, entertainment, music and bars, everything local. Why go for your typical big name brands when we can do better ourselves? The bars included beer from Kelham Island Brewery, Stancill Brewery & Sentinel Brewery whilst True North provided the gin.

Beetle Juice Sheffield Food FestivalThere’s street food traders offering burgers (Cow Boys), poutine (Gravy Train), brat wurst (Get Wurst) and much more. The ice creams sellers were particularly popular thanks to the decent weather.

If you want to do something interesting over the Bank Holiday Weekend, fill your stomach at the Sheffield Food Festival, it’s on until Monday and the Eats, Treats and Beats Village on Fargate stays open until 11pm on Saturday and Sunday.

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Will Arctic Monkeys bring the Kings of Music crown back to the Steel City?

Arctic Monkeys 2018The Steel City gets overlooked as a city of importance compared to many in the UK. London, Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds, Dublin and Glasgow are celebrated more than Sheffield and it seems a bit unfair. We’ve always produced quality, our steel was the best in the world, our beer is and our music scene has had defining moments for generations.

Over the decades our musicians have impacted the sound of pop culture from Def Leppard’s stadium rock anthems in the 1970’s to the electro shift in the 80’s thanks to the Human League. Pulp’s arty take on guitar music coined a different direction for Brit Pop in the 90’s. These bands weren’t the only ones in the city, they were just the ones who broke through to the mainstream but underneath the genre leaders was a vibrant scene that made life up north not so grim.

Music scenes come-and-go. After the heady days of Brit Pop, there was a lull in guitar music as dance music and raves became the phenomena and again, Sheffield offered a helping hand with influential club nights at Gatecrasher. Whilst this was offering an outlet for many, there was a new group of boys in bands, inspired by The Strokes, The White Stripes, Kings of Leon and The Libertines.

Sheffield Steel City isn’t a pretentious city, it’s not overly cool or try hard and the bands who were bringing indie back looked more like they’d come straight from a pluming job or they were off to a football match, but they weren’t ‘lads’. A new scene was forming, The Leadmill, The Boardwalk, The Fuzz Club, The Harley, The Fez Club all played an important role in this new sound that was spearheaded by Milburn who were more influenced by Oasis than The Strokes.

Arctic Monkeys 2003After a couple of years of gigging throughout Sheffield Milburn weren’t the only one picking up guitars in Sheffield. There was 1984, The Dodgems, Little Man Tate, The Long Blondes and of course, High Green’s finest, Arctic Monkeys. This quartet, friends with Milburn nailed their sound relatively quickly. Their first gig took place at The Grapes in the Steel City in June 2003 where they covered Hotel Yorba by The White Stripes.

Over the following 18 months they built up a fan base through gigging, supporting the likes of The Ordinary Boys and Tom Vek but their fans didn’t exclusively come from the Steel City. This was a unique time in music where the internet was building music scenes on web forums. Arctic Monkeys often get labelled the first band of the internet but it was actually The Libertines who took advantage of breaking the fourth wall and using forums to interact with fans. It wasn’t just a platform to do this though, it gave likeminded people to talk to each other, make friends and share music. Arctic Monkeys gave out demos at their gigs and fans uploaded and shared these songs on forums such as the libertines.org and MySpace. It was a natural and authentic move that took the media and the band by surprise.

Arctic Monkeys debut albumAt the time the NME was the indie kid bible and they started taking notice in early 2005. The band were selling out The Boardwalk (whilst working on the bar), with a crowd singing their songs, word-for-word without any official release. By the end of the year the Arctic Monkeys had become the hottest band in the country, they had number one singles, sell out tours and so much hype that helped elevate the whole Sheffield music scene. Bands like Milburn, who had been around much longer than the Monkeys were benefitting.

Arctic Monkeys AMWhatever People Say I Am was released in January 2006 and it remains the fastest selling debut album of all time in the UK. 12 years on and the band haven’t looked back, their sound has evolved as they have grown from teenagers to global rock stars. This Friday (11th May), the band release their sixth album Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino. This is the long-await follow-up to the flawless AM (released in 2013) and expectations are high. People always say that following up a successful debut is the hardest but there wasn’t any signs of that when they released Favourite Worst Nightmare.

Arctic Monkeys Tranquility Base HotelThe bands forthcoming arena tour (including 4 nights at the Sheffield Arena) sold out immediately. There’s going to be ‘pop-up shops’ this weekend across the world (including Barkers Pool in the city centre) and a petition for Alex to shave of his beard (it does look a bit daft). After 5 consistently good albums and 5 years since the highly regarded AM, is this going to be the difficult sixth album or will they put the Steel City back on the map?

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Guest Brewery #4 Magic Rock

Magic Rock BreweryHave you looked in the fridge at your favourite beer stop and been blinded by brightly coloured cans? It’s probably one by Huddersfield breweries Magic Rock who became national favourites almost immediately.

Magic Rock CansThey started as a trio back in 2011 and the team has grown to 30, helping to supply the increasing demands and run their tap room, open 6 days a week.

Inspired by the American craft beer scene the 3 beer fans wanted to create something similar, to sell locally, which, back in early 2011 wasn’t easy to find. These days their beers are bold, unique but delicious. They like to be creative with ingredients but priorities taste over experiment and they’re available in cask, keg, bottle and can. Magic Rock haven’t reinvented the wheel, they have just improved the performance with their proactive attitude.

High Wire Magic RockHigh Wire is their ‘go-to’ beer, popular on tap or in cans, you’ll have seen it in the Ale Club. This West Coast Pale tastes of what Magic Rock were first inspired by, American pales. It’s full flavoured, hoppy and 5.5%, memorable, unless you have a few too many. The term ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ isn’t one that Magic Rock live by as they have reinvented their classic with a second version of the best seller, High Wire Grapefruit, perfect for those who love a punch of tart pink grapefruit infused in their beer.Magic Rock Grapefruit High Wire

Inhaler is a new favourite to the Magic Rock pale family, this session comes in at 4.5% and it’s tropical fruits make it easily drinkable for a sesh.

Magic Rock sours Salty KissSours aren’t for everybody but Salty Kiss is a great introduction for newbies, sharp on the first taste but the gooseberries settle down into something refreshing.

Their adventurous side comes out with the triple coffee porter, Common Grounds whilst they cater for the lager louts with Dancing Bear which will embarrass the corporate brewers.

Their tap room is based on the outskirts of Huddersfield city centre and opens Tuesdays to Sundays. At weekends they host events, food and brewery tours. For more information about Magic Rock visit their website.

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Sheffield: The Outdoor City

The Outdoor CityThe sun is out, finally! It’s felt like an eternity. We’ve battled through dark days, darker nights and snow but, fingers crossed we might be able to pack the coats, scarfs and gloves away, well, for a couple of months anyway. It’s time to grab your sunnies, shorts and enjoy Sheffield, the outdoor city.

Everything looks better in the sun, especially Sheffield, our city. It can be a bleak place in the winter. The weather is probably one of the reasons why we love beer so much. We need it to get through the cold months, then when the sun does make an appearance it becomes ‘beer garden weather’. There’s always an excuse for a pint in the outdoor city.

The city really comes to life in the summertime and it deserves to be explored. Whether you like culture or adventures, you won’t be bored in the outdoor city. The alternative guide to enjoying Sheffield in the sun.

1. Festivals

Music, food, drink, art we’ve got it all going on here. From community street parties such as Sharrow Vale Market to Sheffield Food Festival in the centre, free events that celebrate the city.

Tramlines SheffieldThen of course there’s Tramlines, the music festival, now in its 10th year, it has grown out of it’s inner-city home to Hillsborough Park headlined by Stereophonics, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds and Craig David’s TS5. If you don’t fancy venturing to Hillsborough there will be plenty of fringe events going on in the city centre too.

2. Parks

It’s not just Hillsborough that has a park worth a visit, we’ve got over 200 parks and public gardens, one of the main reasons Sheffield is the outdoor city. Endcliffe Park and the Botanical Gardens are a brief walk from the Ale Club whilst the Peace Gardens is a place to chill in the city centre. Graves Park offers an opportunity to see some animals or play pitch and putt. We’re the 6th greenest city in the UK! If you fancy a short road trip visit the Peak District.

3. Beer Gardens

Brothers Arms beer garden‘It’s beer garden weather’ is probably the most used phrase when we get a glimpse of sun. We’re well prepared for this with some incredible beer gardens all around from The Brothers Arms in Heeley which boasts amazing views of the city to the roof top bar at Krynkl in Kelham Island. The Lescar in Sharrow Vale is peaceful in the afternoon and The Rutland Arms in the centre is always great.

 

4. Activities

Thought skiing was only for snowing mountains? Nope. Sheffield makes use of one the many hills with its ski village. It’s safe to say that it’s had a turbulent past. It’s kind of ironic that it closed down after being destroyed by a fire, but it’s rising like a phoenix in the flames. After being shut for a few years they have finally had investment to reopen in 2019.

5. Ride

Yellow OFO bikesWe’re not only the ‘outdoor city’, we’ve become cycle city since the Ofo yellow bikes landed. Who’d have thought they would have been so successful, especially for a city with so many hills but they are taking over and cycling is the best way to explore.

Summer doesn’t last long, enjoy it with a cold pint in the outdoor city.

For more information on The Outdoor City visit their website.

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Equity for Punks

BrewdogNot another BrewDog blog? Yes, but there’s a reason, two or 75,000 Equity for Punks. For the experienced craft beer taster you might not have touched BrewDog in years, since you found something more niche. It’s probably too mainstream or cliche. Unfortunately their success has led to a backlash but that’s the British for you, always ready to pounce on anybody doing well. I’m pretty sure the Scottish brewers don’t mind upsetting a few people, that has been part of their success and their Equity for Punks campaign shows that they still have a loyal army behind them.

Equity for PunksThis week the Equity for Punks AGM takes place in Aberdeen. This isn’t a boring meeting about ticking boxes in a stuffy office with middle aged men wearing ill-fitting suits. BrewDog have been successful because of investments, not from wealthy businessmen from Dubai who have never tasted an IPA but from their drinkers, over 75,000 of them have invested £55 million in total, breaking the fourth wall between business and consumer. Their crowdfunding campaigns are unique and give customers a voice, their reward, is one hell of a party in the city that is becoming better known for brewing than oil these days.

I am PunkIn the past decade BrewDog has challenged the craft beer industry (notably CAMRA), mainstream alcohol manufactures and tastebuds. Punk, the American influenced IPA is their flagship beer, it was their breakthrough and continues it’s legacy, it’s inspired new brewers, converted lager drinkers to craft beer and it’s found in supermarkets but there’s so much more to BrewDog than Punk.

Putin BrewDogTheir controversial marketing campaigns have helped build exposure, ‘all press is good press’ has certainly been a mindset that BrewDog has taken. The tongue-in-cheek Pink campaign, mocking other brands who use patronising female cliches was misunderstood by many, as was the anti-Putin/pro-gay beer. They celebrated one crowdfunding success by dropping ‘fat cat’ taxidermy from a helicopter over London.

BrewDog End of HistoryThe investments have allowed them to increase their Aberdeen brewery and expand globally. With more brewing opportunities they are able to be more creative, not just in marketing but in their beers too. Their core range is constantly growing and becoming more and more available but it’s their specials which make BrewDog beers interesting, maybe ‘The End of History’, the worlds strongest beer 55% was more of a publicity stunt than something to drink but it was there to prove a point.

BrewDog LoneWolf GinThe presence of BrewDog is increasing too. It wasn’t long ago when pubs were closing down at a rapid rate in the UK, however BrewDog bars have been doing the opposite and opening on high-streets around the world. It’s the fastest growing food and drinks company in the UK, they have also moved into the gin (LoneWolf) and vodka market and as a company they are worth over £1bn, not bad for a couple of home brewers wanting to make a decent pint.

The BrewDog story began like most craft brewers, home brewing, D.I.Y. style, that hobby in 2005 shifted into something ground breaking, a 21st century business model that shows that the world doesn’t need to give in to corporates, like punk did. The business moved from a garage to a warehouse in 2007 and the first beer to be brewed was Punk.

Equity for Punks 2018The Equity for Punks AGM is a ticketed event for the shareholders and they get snapped up immediately. Why? Well, beer, music and food, the perfect collaboration. 7000 Equity for Punks will get a business talk from the owners (it is business after all and there’s always a lot going on at BrewDog), once the numbers have been crunched there’s a great line-up of music including Paws, The Big Moon and Maximo Park. Obviously there’s plenty of beer available too.

Why can’t all businesses run like this?

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Craft Beer in the UK is reaching out to a new audience

Is there a bitter taste is the mouth for craft beer in the UK or is it just evolving?

The craft beer in the UK market is seeing a new shift, a shift even further away from your grandads bitter than ever before. This is due to accessibility and the adaptation of mainstream, taking it from sub-culture to urban culture. The perception of beer is changing, IPAs are gradually winning over lager drinkers, there has never been so much choice. It wasn’t long ago that you’d struggle to find an IPA, it’s hard to avoid Brewdog these days.

Brewdog pinkThe Scottish brewers recently hit the headlines with two campaigns, the ‘Pink’ launch (reaching out to women) and their 1 million giveaway, a ploy to target the Carling crowd. They hope that a free pint of Punk will turn them into paying customers. It isn’t just on paper where Brewdog have been dominating, you’ll find them in the unlikeliest of places, the bars and clubs that wouldn’t have entertained anything other than your standard lager just a few months are now stocking Punk. Music festivals were once a lager filled weekend, Carling used to sponsor Reading and Leeds, these days they are offering craft alternatives. This could be because they can charge more money or that tastes are changing?

Many will argue about Brewdog’s presence in craft beer. They are bit like Man City, they do the job flawlessly but they’ve done it with investment, lots of it. They still claim that they continue with the craft mentality, they continue to take chances, grow. They have been able to break into the mainstream which can only be a great thing for the whole industry. The more people who taste Punk are the next ones who will buy Jaipur, Gamma Ray or High Wire, once hooked there’s no turning back.

There’s a new hierarchy forming, it was noticeable at Sheffield Beer Week. Is it just about investment and marketing or is it quality and innovation? We’ve got the elite brewers (Brewdog, Beavertown, Goose Island), the local heroes (every city has them), the old schoolers, the breakthrough home brewers and the underdogs who are a bit left wing.

Bitter about bitter, or lack of? Real ale was, up until recently what your granddad drank, that murky, still, warm liquid in a pint class. It wasn’t sexy like your pint of Bud. Bitter is the reason beer gets a bad reputation. The pale ales have been changing that perception, the fruity aromas are much more palatable on the tastebuds making it much easier to convert lager drinkers, it makes brewing a better business model.

The UK craft beer scene might be growing but with all the focus on developing and twisting the IPA, the bitter has been forgotten about by many new breweries. The old men who spend their afternoons in the pub are finding it hard to jump on the craft beer bandwagon. They don’t care about the artwork, if it’s suitable for Vegans or made with ingredients sourced locally, they just want the bitter taste that they have always loved and change from £3. They don’t care for Man City’s slick techniques, forward thinking attitudes and big money innovations, they are happy with Burnley’s solid reputation, it might not be exciting but it works.

Is brewing becoming more about spreadsheets and sales figures or is there true love in that 330ml can that costs £8? They’ll always be businesses in any industry but it’s those who work with passion who will succeed in the long-term. What makes craft beer in the UK great in 2018 is that there’s a taste and budget for everybody.

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What’s on for Easter in Sheffield

Easter Bank Holiday Weekend is the perfect opportunity to party! There’s not the pressure like Christmas and it’s a long one! So, what is happening at Easter in Sheffield?

Easter in Sheffield Craft BeedIt’s a four-dayer and it all kicks off on Good Friday at Yellow Arch in Kelham Island for their beer festival. The iconic venue are hosting their 3rd beer festival with some of Sheffield’s finest breweries include The Brew Foundation! We’ll be there, with great company from Stancill Brewery and Lost Industry Brewing. All good festivals need food and Proove Pizza are doing just that. It’s great value for money as entrance is just £1.50 (pint class included!) and there’s DJs playing funk until ‘late’. More details available here.

Easter in Sheffield BBQHopefully the weather picks up (not looking likely) as Smo Fo Pit Stop is taking place throughout the weekend at Summit House car park on Eyre Street with BBQ food, craft beer and bands. This pop—up event is the first of what will become a monthly event. They’ve sourced some of the best BBQ going, catering for carnivores and vegans so that nobody goes hungry. Beer is supplied by Sheffield favourites, Abbeydale Brewery, Sentinel and Kelham Island Brewery. Fingers crossed that the weather men are wrong, BBQ is the snow isn’t ideal. More info here.

Remember, Jesus died for this!

Canalside Night MarketSaturday sees the 3rd Canalside Night Market at the Southbank Warehouse. Kicking off at 2 there’s a wide range of food and drink available including a bar dedicated to gin. There’ll also be live music, DJ’s and artists keeping entertainment going until 11pm.

More details here.

Easter in Sheffield Leadmill specialOnce you’ve eaten your way through your chocolate eggs to get over the hangover, Easter Sunday is all about letting loose and Common People at the Leadmilli ideal for Brit pop and noughties indie fans as hits will be played from 11pm to 4am.

There’s plenty to do for Easter in Sheffield, make the most from the long weekend. Don’t forget to pop in to the Ale Club, we are open all weekend!